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Hit and Run Laws in Florida

“Hit and Run”: it’s more than just a page out of the Miami Dolphins’ defensive playbook. In all seriousness, “hit and run” (or, more precisely, “leaving the scene of an accident”) is against the law in Florida. Florida’s laws on this subject depend on whether the driver hit an unattended vehicle or property or was involved in a crash resulting in injury or death of any person or damage to an attended vehicle.

Florida Law on Crash Involving Unattended Vehicle or Property

Ever bumped the car parked next to you in a crowed parking lot or perhaps hit a neighbor’s mailbox while backing out of your driveway? While it certainly can be tempting—especially when there are no witnesses to the accident—to just leave the scene of the accident, this is never the right choice. After all, not only is there that whole “character is what you do when no one is watching” adage, but also it’s against the law in Florida.

Pursuant to Florida Statute §316.063(1), “The driver of any vehicle which collides with, or is involved in a crash with, any vehicle or other property which is unattended, resulting in any damage to such other vehicle or property, shall immediately stop and shall then and there either locate and notify the operator or owner of the vehicle or other property of the driver’s name and address and the registration number of the vehicle he or she is driving, or shall attach securely in a conspicuous place in or on the vehicle or other property a written notice giving the driver’s name and address and the registration number of the vehicle he or she is driving, and shall without unnecessary delay notify the nearest office of a duly authorized police authority.” Failure to comply with this statute is a second degree misdemeanor in Florida, punishable by up to 60 days in jail and up to a $500 fine.

Florida Law on Crash Resulting in Injury or Death or Damage to Attended Vehicle

Florida Statute §316.062 states that, “The driver of any vehicle involved in a crash resulting in injury to or death of any person or damage to any vehicle or other property which is driven or attended by any person shall give his or her name, address, and the registration number of the vehicle he or she is driving, and shall upon request and if available exhibit his or her license or permit to drive, to any person injured in such crash or to the driver or occupant of or person attending any vehicle or other property damaged in the crash and shall give such information and, upon request, exhibit such license or permit to any police officer at the scene of the crash or who is investigating the crash and shall render to any person injured in the crash reasonable assistance, including the carrying, or the making of arrangements for the carrying, of such person to a physician, surgeon, or hospital for medical or surgical treatment if it is apparent that treatment is necessary, or if such carrying is requested by the injured person.” Violation of this statute is punishable as a non-moving traffic violation in Florida.

Pursuant to Florida Statute §316.027(1)(a), “The driver of any vehicle involved in a crash occurring on public or private property that results in injury of any person must immediately stop the vehicle at the scene of the crash, or as close thereto as possible, and must remain at the scene of the crash until he or she has fulfilled the requirements of s. 316.062.” Willful violation of this statute is a third degree felony in Florida, punishable by up to five years in prison and up to a $3,000 fine.

Pursuant to Florida Stature §316.027(1)(b), “The driver of any vehicle involved in a crash occurring on public or private property that results in the death of any person must immediately stop the vehicle at the scene of the crash, or as close thereto as possible, and must remain at the scene of the crash until he or she has fulfilled the requirements of s. 316.062.” Willful violation of this statute is a first degree felony in Florida, punishable by up to 30 years in prison and up to a $10,000 fine.

If you have been charged with leaving the scene of an accident in Florida, immediately contact an experienced Miami criminal attorney or Fort Lauderdale criminal attorney. The attorneys at the South Florida law firm of Galanter Law are experienced in defending clients with these types of charges and will aggressively work to try to get your charges dismissed or reduced.

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